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My 2021 New Year's Resolutions

  In 2019, I made my New Year's Resolution to not drink in 2020. I had no idea what 2020 had in store, and I made it until RBG died, September 18th 2020, before I drank again. Even after, I hadn't had more than a few drinks at a time since. I still plan on not drinking or getting drunk, but it inspired me to make a ton of New Year's Resolutions for 2021. Resolutions I'm not sure if I'll make any of these come true, but if I could have some success on the last resolution, maybe I can be successful with a few more. I'm not comfortable sharing every goal, but there are a few that I think maybe fun to reflect on later! Two traditional goals, and two wardriving goals!  1) Meatless Mondays 2) No Candy Wednesdays 3) Submit to Wigle every month 4) ....and the Grand Finale: Make an optimized trip half-way across the country in my truck! The first two goals are based on my consumption. I eat way too much candy and I don't have to explain why that's bad -  and I sh
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3 The Three Questions: Do you think you speak pretentiously?

The Three Questions Question 1 of 3 This is a series of blog posts based on questions I asked my peers and strangers starting summer 2020. I created these questions with Brock and Arvin one day through a string of conversations, and I've been obsessed with them ever since. First Question. Do you think you speak pretentiously? Do you think I speak pretentiously? Once when asking this question to an admired graduate student, he responded, "the word 'pretentiously' is pretentious." I was absolutely floored. First, I have asked this question to at least 60 different people at this point, and that's the first time someone's made that remark. Next, that I wouldn't at all considered the word "pretentiously" pretentious at all. Fuck. The question isn't designed to reach the entire audience of people I want it to reach. The problem with pretentious language is that it's not accessible. I can understand the usefulness of, at times, sounding pre

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Practicing the DFIR basics with the Digital Forensics Workbook

Digital Forensics is not a passively learned discipline. Unfortunately, many practitioners are a part of "push button" forensics, which is a necessary evil in some instances to process a high amount of cases.  My favorite introduction into immediately working with digital forensics in the Digital Forensics Workbook by Michael K Robinson .  This book was published in 2015. Many of the activities are still valid, but some of them no longer work or are no longer valid due to technological change. I would still use this workbook to teach and find 80+% still usable. I applaud Michael Robinson for writing the book that we needed in digital forensics and I hope that he produces a new one in the coming years.  A complaint I've received from students is that this workbook is very Windows focused. Some do not want to bother with making these exercises work on an operating system that allows them to claim superiority over each other. I do not believe Michael intended his readers to