Skip to main content

Posts

Overwriting Deleted Files in Windows

 Once a file is deleted, most operating systems will still hold on to the file. The link between the operating system and the file is removed, but the data is still on the disk waiting to be overwritten or used for something else. A common utility seen in the wild is Eraser  but it's a bloated utility that takes a long time. It's a good utility if you really need to overwrite a Windows machine more than 3 times - but the use case for this is minimal.  pause: this article surrounds mostly HDD, as files are recoverable on these drives if not overwritten. For SSDs, this is just going to cause more wear to your drive! An underutilized tool is cipher . In Windows, it displays or alters the encryption of directories and files on NTFS volumes. But, with the option w  it overwrites deleted files and empty space of a drive. You can use it on the same drive the OS is located, external drives, and removable media. It's easy to use! If your OS is installed on C: and you want to remove
Recent posts

My 2021 New Year's Resolutions

  In 2019, I made my New Year's Resolution to not drink in 2020. I had no idea what 2020 had in store, and I made it until RBG died, September 18th 2020, before I drank again. Even after, I hadn't had more than a few drinks at a time since. I still plan on not drinking or getting drunk, but it inspired me to make a ton of New Year's Resolutions for 2021. Resolutions I'm not sure if I'll make any of these come true, but if I could have some success on the last resolution, maybe I can be successful with a few more. I'm not comfortable sharing every goal, but there are a few that I think maybe fun to reflect on later! Two traditional goals, and two wardriving goals!  1) Meatless Mondays 2) No Candy Wednesdays 3) Submit to Wigle every month 4) ....and the Grand Finale: Make an optimized trip half-way across the country in my truck! The first two goals are based on my consumption. I eat way too much candy and I don't have to explain why that's bad -  and I sh

3 The Three Questions: Do you think you speak pretentiously?

The Three Questions Question 1 of 3 This is a series of blog posts based on questions I asked my peers and strangers starting summer 2020. I created these questions with Brock and Arvin one day through a string of conversations, and I've been obsessed with them ever since. First Question. Do you think you speak pretentiously? Do you think I speak pretentiously? Once when asking this question to an admired graduate student, he responded, "the word 'pretentiously' is pretentious." I was absolutely floored. First, I have asked this question to at least 60 different people at this point, and that's the first time someone's made that remark. Next, that I wouldn't at all considered the word "pretentiously" pretentious at all. Fuck. The question isn't designed to reach the entire audience of people I want it to reach. The problem with pretentious language is that it's not accessible. I can understand the usefulness of, at times, sounding pre

PSA: Free 24/7 Crisis Help